Washington library registering for summer reading programs

May 22, 2014 4:25 PM

Washington Library

 

By Sabrina Westfall

The Washington Carnegie Library has kicked off registration for the summer reading program for ages 2-years-old to adult.

Library Director Teresa Heidenreich said they started the registration early this year considering school will be starting earlier next year. The six week program will run to the end of July.

Heidenreich said it is important to also host a summer reading program geared towards adults as well because a lot of the library’s readership has reached a retirement age.

“We want to focus on lifelong literacy and lifelong learning,” Heidenreich stressed.

The “Fizzle. Boom. Read” program for children ages 2 to grade five will end the summer with a Scholastic Book Fair where students can cash in their “Book Bucks”.

Youth Services Librarian Lori Osmon explained the weekly game for those up to just before entering kindergarten (Wee Group) will need have seven books read to them each week. For each book the child will color in a picture in the column.

Students who have completed kindergarten through grade 5 will readh 20 minutes a day (140 minutes a week) to color their weekly entry in the Summer Reading Club booklet.

The final prize for completing the program will be $5 in Book Bucks for the Scholastic Book Fair at the library from July 14 to 19.

The Teen Summer Reading Program’s theme is “Spark a Reaction” for grades 6 to 12. During the course of the program, students will need to read five books and choose five tasks from a list that include reading to a child, designing a cover for their favorite book and more.

Heidenreich said the adult summer reading program will have a unique experience as Programming Librarian Rick Chambon was previously a travel agent and uses his travels to inspire the program.

This summer’s theme will revolve around fictional and non-fictional titles dealing with stolen art work. The title of the theme will be “Raiders of the Lost Art”, which Heidenreich her librarian for the unique name.

She said in addition to promoting literacy the program can be a meeting ground for those who are new to the area or looking to meet new people.

Heidenreich said it’s important to continue promoting library programs because many people purchase books when they could just borrow from the library.

“The one thing in America that is free to you is your intellectual freedom,” Heidenreich said.

To learn more about the Washington Carnegie Library or to register for one of the summer reading programs, stop by the 300 W. Main Street location or call 812-254-4586.

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